Souped-up sesame broccoli recipe revealed

della bowls has a tasty secret to share! Many of you #dellafam out there have asked us what we do to make our broccoli taste so damn good, even non-broc-lovers love our souped-up sesame broccoli! But, before we spill the beans, we want to know...

How do you enjoy that crave-able sesame broccoli?

  • In the Forbidden bowl? Layers of coconut black rice, perfectly-seasoned tempeh, roasted sweet potatoes, raw roots, and mixed greens come together with della bowls sesame broccoli to create a mouth-watering combo that screams for our Asian-inspired gold sauce. Topped with toasted almonds, this bowl transports you to the Orient in a healthy, fresh way!
  • In della's Green bowl? Layered with tri-colored quinoa, protein powered lentils, marinated kale, creamy avocado and green sauce, sesame broccoli compliments this bowls' flavors and colors! Top it off with toasted almonds and you have a power-packed bowl of green goodness! 
  • BYOB: Are you more of a DIY kinda person? Do you add sesame broccoli to your own della creation every time you order or just sometimes? We always love to hear how you let your creative juices flow!

 

Why eat broccoli? 

  • It's one of the healthiest veggies you can consume. In fact, it's in the top 20 healthiest foods, according to the ANDI (Aggregate Nutrient Density Index).
  • Broccoli belongs to the vitamin-rich cruciferous vegetable family, along with Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale, and others
  • It's a nutrition powerhouse that supplies loads of nutrients for few calories
  • Studies suggest that increased consumption of plant foods like broccoli decreases the risk of obesity, diabetes and heart disease.
  • It may also promote a healthy complexion and hair, increased energy, and overall lower weight.
  • Eating a high amount of cruciferous vegetables has been associated with a lower risk of cancer; particularly lung and colon cancer.
  • It's believed that the sulfur-containing compound that gives cruciferous vegetables their bitter bite, called Sulforaphane, is also what gives them their cancer-fighting power
  • Broccoli contains folate, a vitamin that has been found to decrease the risk of breast cancer in women, and reduces the risk of colon, stomach, pancreatic, and cervical cancers
  • Broccoli contributes to your daily need for calcium, providing 43 milligrams in one cup
  • One cup of chopped broccoli provides 92 micrograms of vitamin K, (over 100% of your daily recommended amount), which improves bone health by increasing absorption of calcium

  • Broccoli contains the antioxidant vitamin C, which when eaten in its natural form, is shown to help fight skin damage caused by the sun and pollution, reduce wrinkles, and improve overall skin texture
  • One cup provides more that 100% of your daily recommended amount of vitamin C, which plays a vital role in the formation of collagen, the support system for the skin
  • Broccoli also provide vitamins A and E, also key ingredients for healthy looking skin
  • It works to improve digestion and aids in natural detoxification
  • Broccoli contains dietary fiber, which can prevent constipation, maintain a healthy digestive tract, and lower the risk of colon cancer
  • Increased fiber intake has also been shown to lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, improve insulin level, and enhance weight loss

So... How do we make ours so tasty? 

Here are a few tips on cooking broccoli to perfection. 

Always blanch broccoli before sautéing it. Blanching is the practice of dropping cut and washed vegetables into a salted bath of rapidly boiling water, removing after only a minute or two. Strain the boiling water and dip the vegetables immediately in an ice bath.  Blanching par-cooks the broccoli, then shocks it to retain color. 

We love coconut oil for its health benefits, plus it's a great high-heat oil to sauté. Get your pan nice and hot, then add the oil. When it's liquid and just about to smoke, it's ready to add the broccoli. 

Many recipes call for adding garlic to the pan before the food. We don't do this for 2 reasons. For one, we don't want the garlic to burn. Second, we love the bright flavor of garlic. Adding it after the broccoli gives a nice garlic flavor, without as much risk of burning. 

Don't forget the 2 key ingredients! Lemon zest and sesame seeds make this broccoli what it is! You may even want to double up on these ingredients if you like your food zesty! 

 Recipe 

  • 4 cups broccoli florets - about 1.5 lbs
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1 clove garlic, sliced
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 2 teaspoons sesame seeds, raw unhulled
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Preparation

Blanch broccoli in a large pot of boiling water with salt.  Shock immediately in an ice bath and drain.

Heat a skillet and add coconut oil.   

Add the broccoli and sauté. After a minute, add the garlic. Season with salt. Sauté a few more minutes, until the broccoli starts to brown a tiny bit. 

Add the lemon zest and sesame seeds. Stir over heat for another minute.

Remove from heat and serve!